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HaloTag Amine (O4) Ligand

by Promega
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  • Ligand Building Blocks can carry a variety of functionalities, including fluorescent labels, affinity tags and attachments to a solid phase. The covalent bond forms rapidly under general physiological conditions, is highly specific and essentially irreversible. The HaloTag® Ligand Building Blocks allow researchers to apply the chloroalkane group that HaloTag® protein reacts with to any compound or surface with a compatible chemical group, creating endless possible applications.

    The HaloTag® Succinimidyl Ester (O4) Ligand contains a reactive succinimidyl ester (SE) group connected to an alkyl chloride separated by three ethylene glycol repeats (O4). The HaloTag® Succinimidyl Ester (O4) Ligand can be successfully conjugated to any reporter group, protein, or nucleic acid derivative containing an amine, forming stable amide bond linkages. The ligand with functional group can then be used with the HaloTag® protein for any application of interest.

    The HaloTag® Succinimidyl Ester (O2) Ligand contains a reactive succinimidyl ester (SE) group connected to an alkylchloride separated by an ethylene glycol repeat (O2). The HaloTag® Succinimidyl Ester (O2) Ligand can be successfully conjugated to any reporter group, protein, or nucleic acid derivative containing an amine, forming stable amide bond linkages (see figure). The ligand with functional group can then be used with the HaloTag® protein for any application of interest.

    The HaloTag® Amine (O4) Ligand contains a reactive amine group connected to an alkyl chloride, separated by an ethylene glycol repeat (O4). The HaloTag® Amine (O4) Ligand can be successfully conjugated to any reporter group, protein, or nucleic acid derivative containing an activated carboxylic acid, sulfonyl halide or isocyanate. Examples of activated carboxylic acids are succinimidyl esters, STP esters, acid halides, and TFP esters. The ligand with functional group can then be used with the HaloTag® protein for any application of interest.

    The HaloTag® Amine (O2) Ligand contains a reactive amine group connected to an alkylchloride, separated by an ethylene glycol repeat (O2). The HaloTag® Amine (O2) Ligand can be successfully conjugated to any reporter group, protein, or nucleic acid derivative containing an activated carboxylic acid, sulfonyl halide or isocyanate. Examples of activated carboxylic acids are succinimidyl esters (see figure), STP esters, acid halides and TFP esters. The ligand with functional group can then be used with the HaloTag® protein for any application of interest.

    The HaloTag® Iodoacetamide (O4) Ligand contains a reactive iodoacetamide group connected an alkyl chloride separated by an ethylene glycol repeat (O4). The HaloTag® Iodoacetamide (O4) Ligand has been designed to rapidly react with sulfhydryl-containing molecules (see figure), whether small organic compounds, peptides or proteins. The ligand with functional group can then be used with the HaloTag® protein for any application of interest.

    The HaloTag® Thiol (O4) Ligand contains a reactive sulfhydryl group connected to an alkyl chloride separated by three ethylene glycol repeats (O4). The HaloTag® Thiol (O4) Ligand can be successfully conjugated to any reporter group, cross-linking reagent (bound or free), or nucleic acid derivative containing a number of different alkylating groups, forming stable thioether bonds. Commonly used reagents (see figure) that rapidly react with sulfhydryls include iodo- or bromo-acetyls or benzyls, bromo- or chloro-mustards, maleimides, aziridines, acryloyl derivatives, and halide or sulfonate containing arenes (those bearing Electron Withdrawing Groups (EWGs) react most rapidly). The reactive ligand can be captured with HaloTag® protein either before or after the thiol group is functionalized for any application of interest.

    For more information, see the Protocols & Applications Guide.

    References
    1. Hermanson, G.T. (1996) In: Bioconjugate Techniques, Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 139–40.
    2. Gretch, D.R., Suter, M. and Stinski, M.F. (1987) Anal. Biochem. 163, 270–77.
    3. Duthie, R.S. et al. (2002) Bioconjugate Chem. 13, 699–706.
    4. Hermanson, G.T. (1996) In: Bioconjugate Techniques, Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 137–46.
    5. Gee, K.R. et al. (1999) Tetrahedron Letters 40, 1471–4.
    6. Adamczyk, M. et al. (1997) Bioconjugate Chem. 8, 253–5.
    7. Hermanson, G.T. (1996) In: Bioconjugate Techniques, Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 146–8.
    8. Chen, J. and Selvin, P.R. (1999) Bioconjugate Chem. 10, 311–5.
    9. Ge, P. and Selvin, P.R. (2003) Bioconjugate Chem. 14, 870–76.
    10. Krokhin, O.V. et al. (2003) Biochemistry 42, 12950–59.
    11. Hermanson, G.T. (1996) In: Bioconjugate Techniques, Academic Press, San Diego, CA, 146–52.
    Example reaction with HaloTag® Amine (O4) Ligand.
    Example reaction with HaloTag® Amine (O4) Ligand.
  • Protocols

    Complete Protocol

    Download PDF

    HaloTag® Technology: Focus on Imaging Technical Manual

    PDF (1 MB)

    Video Protocols

    28440899-HALOTAG-ANIMATION-fallback
  • Certificate of Analysis

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    Storage Conditions

    LESS THAN -65C

    Use Restrictions

    For Research Use Only. Not for Use in Diagnostic Procedures.

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